The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century
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The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century

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Published by [Norristown Press] in Norristown, Pa .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Mennonites -- Pennsylvania.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementC. Henry Smith.
SeriesPennslvania : the German influences in its settlement and development -- pt. 33, Library of American civilization -- LAC 13914.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination412 p.
Number of Pages412
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17571343M

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Get this from a library! The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the 18th century. [C Henry Smith]. 34 C. Henry Smith, The Mennonite Immigration to Pennsylvania in the Eighteenth Century, pp. 35 Crous, p. 36 C. Henry Smith, The Mennonite Immigration to Pennsylvania in the Eighteenth Century, pp. It is interesting to note that among those who came to Pennsylvania were Krehbiels, Millers, Zergers, and Schrags.   Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. The Mennonite immigration to Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century by C. Henry Smith, , [Norristown Press] edition, Microform in English. Irish Quakers came to Pennsylvania as early as the 17th Century. An outstanding historical study with brief biographies and names of extended family members remaining in Ireland, and which provides a summary of Irish Quaker emigration and migration to the state, is: Immigration of Irish Quakers to Pennsylvania,

Many Mennonites emigrated to North America in the late seventeenth century to escape religious persecution in Europe. Attracted by William Penn’s promise of a “holy experiment” where believers of multiple religious backgrounds could live in peace, the first wave of Mennonite immigrants arrived in Pennsylvania by October A few Dutch Mennonites began the immigration to America in , followed by a larger immigration of Swiss-German Mennonites beginning in In the s Dutch Mennonites, who had settled in the German Kingdom of Prussia and then Russia, moved to the United States and Canada where they became known as Russian Mennonites. German Immigration to Pennsylvania, to I The largest group of non-British Europeans arriving in North America during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries were Germans. Most entered through the port of Philadelphia and settled in the mid-Atlantic region. From to , Ger-man immigrants represented 20 to 30 percent of the population. Nineteenth-century German immigration to Pennsylvania never matched the levels from the pre-Revolutionary War era and generally declined after the Civil War. Immigration from Germany rose briefly during the s when new immigration quotas favored old immigrants while severely restricting arrivals from southern and eastern Europe.

By the American Revolution, there were at least eight Amish settlements in Pennsylvania and by the end of the eighteenth century the population had expanded into Somerset and Mifflin counties. In , at the end of the Napoleonic Wars, the second wave of Amish immigration into the United States began. to present, pages. Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage, the Society’s quarterly magazine, focuses on the historical background (Europe and America), religious thought and expression, culture, and family history of Mennonite and Amish-related groups originating in onal features: genealogical tips, readers’ ancestry, queries, Pennsylvania German dialect stories, and. This DNA Project focuses specifically on Mennonite and Amish Immigrants to Pennsylvania and their families and descendants. This project originated in October as the "DNA Pilot Project" through the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, Lancaster, Pa., in reference to the three hundred year anniversary of the first Mennonite settlers to what is now Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Mennonite emigration to Pennsylvania: Friendly relations between the Mennonites in Holland and those in Pennsylvania [Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Mennonite emigration to Pennsylvania: Friendly relations between the Mennonites in Holland and those in PennsylvaniaAuthor: Jacob Gijsbert de Hoop Scheffer.